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economically robust parks program in america. we had a cell phone app, parka meanttionv, park hours, park programs. we can now register online and having wi-fi in our parks will make it easier for park users and frankly our staff to deliver the programs and services that the public expects in our open space. so, we're thrilled ~. government can't do it alone any more, so, this is really about partnership. we're so thankful to google and veronika, thank you for hanging with us. thank you to sf city. a big thanks to mark, supervisor farrell for stewarding this. and also a big thanks to the mayor who has really given us room to be innovative, room to pursue public private partnerships and has really supported innovation in our parks. and, john, thank you for hosting us here. supervisor avalos has been an incredible advocate for our neighborhood parks and one of the things great about this gift, this is not just going to parks frequented by tourists or destination parks. this is a benefit that is going into our neighborhoods. so, we're really thrilled. the last folks i want to thank are my ow
wage -- average person in america is making $53,000 a year with a minimum wage worker, that's over two times the poverty rate. minimum wage has little to do with poverty. >> in fact, tracy, it's not the recession that americans are pointing to about why it's wrong to be dependent on government. but, in fact, it's the ease of getting a system. it's not the recession. you can get food stamps quite easily. >> look, i agree with jehmu. there was a time when it was embarrassing. my family immigrated, they would never in a million years take a government handout. things have changed, jehmu since you were a kid. hey, my neighbor's getting a check, i want one too. how come i didn't get a first-time home buyers check. everyone else got something i didn't. now we're starting to feel like, hey, where's my cut. and that's a bad, bad place for our country to be in. >> do you want to respond? >> well, again, i know from personal experience that the majority, overwhelming majority of people who are having to receive these programs to stand in the line and pay for their food with food stamps with the
sisters. they're twins with each other. twin kids would be great. >>> making news in america this morning. >> stay with us for "good morning america." and have a wonderful thursday, everyone. >>> the man accused of killing a cop right in front of their young daughter is in custody this morning. now those who knew the victims are trying to come to terms with the horrific crime. >>> the raiives are getting ready to -- the ravens are getting ready to hit the field for the third preseason game. a look at what the weather will be like when you head down to m and t bank stadium. >> thanks for joining us, friday is almost here, i'm megan pringle. >> i'm charley crowson. a live look down at little italy. a beautiful start to this thursday, august 22nd. lynette, what's going on weather wise today? >> all right, charley, yes, we do have the potential for more showers and storms, isolated, scattered in nature as we go throughout the day. like you said, right now we are nice and dry. we do have a few clouds out there. but all in all we will need the umbrella as we go into the afternoon, just some of
. they would say, the united states of america are. which signaled that it was not quite holding together. there was a fear it was holding -- going to fall apart. they called it regionalism, and later they call is sectionalism as they head to the civil war. so we know that nation is going to be a strong nation state, it is a democracy, and a two-party system and a strong president. that was none of the things the founders had intended. we look back and see that time as a time of growing pains. and we see dolley madison not knowing how this would end, was the perfect person to ease into the country and twa it was going to be. >> serving as the chief executive of the nation, he brought the real concept of how he wanted the role to be carried out. how did he approach it and how did she help him? >> well, you said "concept," and i think that's perfect, because he was the idea guy. he was very theoretical. he and other members of the founding generation understood as a concept "unit." it was their number one job. how do you do it? how do you bring forth unity? what dolley madison did is take t
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
-in movie theaters. now the drive-ins threatened with extinction. the vice president of honda america will be here with that companies plan to save drivers coming up. "markets now" continues in a moment. stay with us. see, the special psyllium fiber in metamucil actually gels. and that gelling hes to lower some cholesterol. metacil. 3 amazing benefits in 1 super fiber. hundred pound gorilla of retail, walmart, pressure at this hour responsible for 14 points of losses. the retailer cutting its annual profit forecast, we debate the wear and the why of walmart's problems with our panel. raising the roof on housing yet again, home builder confidence rising to the highest level in eight years. a brand new feature on fox business as we break down home construction costs. plus savings driving movie theaters, once they were plenty but not yet threatened with extinction, vice president of honda america to help save and american institution. it is exactly the top of the hour as we go 15 minutes, stocks and l. the steepest decline since june 20th, nicole petallides watching the data, the numbers
of the united states of america, and to me, everybody that's willing -- strike that. everybody that's able to make that contribution should be forced to do it. then when the congress says that it's mandatory that we send troops, and these troops may be in harm's way, members of congress will hear from their voters, and their voters would say whether or not in their opinion there should be a red line, or in their opinion, whether or not the united states should attack another country, whether you call it war, limited war, the fact remains we were looking for weapons of mass sdru destructions, we didn't find it. so we know what war is, and people that have been involved in war know that it's hell, and it shouldn't be based on drawing red lines. >> you're obviously being very critical of the president right now for drawing that red line. i want to get reaction from your colleague, republican congressman peter king of long island. he's the chairman of the house subcommittee on counterterrorism -- counterintelligence and terrorism. this is a statement. i'll read it to you, congressman. presiden
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
higher for the remainder of the year. and, again, in 2014, we'll talk to the ceo of america's natural gas alliance. and next, as we head to break, a look at july's best and worst-performing dow components. if you're serious about taking your trading to a higher level, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then schwab is the place to trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-888-284-9410 or visit schwab.com/trading to tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 learn how you can earn up to 300 commission-free online trades tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 for six months with qualifying net deposits. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 see how easy and intuitive it is to use tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 our most powerful platform, streetsmart edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 we put it in the cloud so you can use it on the web. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade with our most advanced tools tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 on whatever computer you're on. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 also, get a dedicated team of schwab trading specialists tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 who will help you customize your platform tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 even from the comfort of your home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and talk about ideas and
worse. the pace of decline of america's middle class has actually speeded up in the obama years. median income down 4.4% since june of '09. >> so he accelerated income ee quality. >> he increased it. we're going to watch varney and company on friday. the friday edition is always the best and often ends in song. >> it is? >> yes. >> there's a promo. >> thanks, everyone. >>> this guy says black people can't survive unless a lot of whites are killed. and guess what? he works for the department of homeland security. so why hasn't he been fired? a former department of justice employee says he knows and he's going to join us next. >>> and barely even back to school, just beginning to look like christmas at some stores. what the heck is happening? we'll tell you why this year is different and starting much earlier. >> oh, no. ♪ so then the little tiny chipmunks go all the way up... ♪ [ female announcer ] when your swapportunity comes, take it. ♪ what? what? what? [ female announcer ] yoplait. it is so good. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn, what? what? relief is at han
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
to revolutionize high-speed travel in america. phil lebeau joins us now. we understand his announcement, more details in maybe an hour's time. >> we'll hear about the hyperloop, or at least his vision of it. the hyperloop hoopla is what we're looking at, because we don't have an indication of what he's going to tell us. he told us it's a theory. not a company he's forming. it's his vision of the future. it will be solar-powered and have the cost lower than what it would take to take a comparable trip in planes or trains. he tweeted a few hours before he pulled an all-nighter developing his hyperloop plan. the hyperloop will have an open architecture, so in other words, if other technology companies, other software engineers, if they want to add to the hyperloop that he throws out there, that's a possibility. i want to show you the animation, because this is the vision of a company out of colorado. et-3, it's developing tube transport technology. it's already issuing licenses to technology partners, similar to what musk has talked about, an open architecture. et-3 says tube transport costs wil
in brazil. >> let me make it clear, the policy of the united states of america with respect to all settlements is that they are illegitimate. and we oppose settlements taking place at any time, not just the time of the... of the peace process. >> reporter: in a separate move, israel carried out a promise that led to the peace negotiations by releasing 26 palestinian prisoners. buses left a prison in central israel after nightfall. the inmates had been held on charges ranging from rock- throwing to deadly bombings. the israeli military shot down a rocket launched at a resort town near the egyptian border today. the attack targeted eilat on the red sea. officials said it's the first time israel's iron dome defense system had intercepted a rocket there. militants based in egypt's sinai peninsula claimed responsibility for the attack. another apparent u.s. drone strike in yemen killed two more militants late monday. it brings to 37 the number believed killed in the last two weeks amid warnings al qaeda in the arabian peninsula was planning attacks in the region. the group is considered
-market system in the united states of america. [applause] i am working every day to try to help carry that free-market message and try to help when the argument. how many of you have phones on you? take out your phones and text the word growth to 33733. text "growth" to 33733. we are working to try to build a conservative army across this country that will stand up and fight to bring us back to our free-market principles, bring us back to our constitutional liberties, and the only way we can do it is to bring together millions of conservatives across the country. freedom is not some abstract academic concept. it is something we know in our own lives. in my life, my dad was born in cuba. he was imprisoned and tortured, almost beaten to death. he fled in 1957, fleeing the batista regime. he was 18 and could not speak a word of english. nothing but $100 in his underwear. i don't advise carrying money in your underwear. he washed dishes to pay his way to the university of texas. he went on to start a small business, to work words the american dream. my dad used to say to me over and over again, and
've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> labor day just a couple of weeks away. we're firing up the barbecue because it's cookout week here on "mad money." and you know what, this cookout really couldn't have come at a better time. with the market feeling like it's ready to take a bit of a breather, you might want to side l up to more defensive stocks. perhaps in the spirit of what liquor can do for you. last night, i told you about the healthy organic food i'll be grilling up. you can't have a barbecue with nothing more than just tofu and soy milk. the key ingredient to any cookout is brewskis. and looking like we've got a burgeoning red hot bull market in the beer stocks. in the first four weeks ending on the 3rd, beer sales up 3.8%. that's a huge acceleration from the 1.8% increase in the pre
. plus, hundreds of feet beneath a mcdonald's a hidden chamber where america stored nukes. >> this is constantly alarmed and there is a guard course protecting this facility. >> for decades it was a secret. >> the rumors have been around forever. >> there was a feeling that there was something going on down here. now, fox news takes you inside the lois los alamos nuclear tunnel. first from fox this wednesday night, the baby shot to death in his stroller. today, in court heard from a teenager who stood and watched as an older teen shot 13 month old santiago in the face. police call the younger teen an accomplice. prosecutors have asked him to testify as the older teen stands trial. both suspects face murder charges. this is the teenager on trial now. police say he tried to rob the mother on a street in southeast georgia back in march. they say the mom claimed she didn't have any money and that's when the teen shot her in the leg and in the ear and shot the baby in the head. one bullet. between the eyes. but defense attorneys have suggested the mother had a financial interes
is truly a global citizen, though he was born in the united states of america, i think part of me wonders how much this weighs on him. certainly i think the problems he faces domestically must weigh on him. to be president of the united states at a time when there is slaughter happening in syria to the tune of 100,000 people killed, 1.7 million refugees flooding into other parts of the arab world, egypt, which is completely destabilized where you have atrocities happening, slayings of people on buses, unarmed civilians, tear gas and/or chemical attacks in syria, it is, i think, hard to sort of reconcile what we think of the president and who he is as a man. >> right. >> with the inaction from the courthous white house. i wonder what your take is on that knowing him as you do. >> i'm sure that weighs on him terribly. he's also a pragmatic man. he has advisers who are telling him what his options are and what our options are and they are limited. that's not a satisfying thing to hear and it's frustrating but he's also realistic. he knows some of these things, what you want to do takes time.
in that he believed that business in america should serve some point. there should be an and the business. it didn't message you have to have a broad social and that there should be some point to it, which automatically testing wishes and for most of our business folks from today. he had kind of an enlightened sense of what this is journalism could be about. >> he didn't mind criticism of business. >> that's right. let's face it, when it's 1933 and its 1934, it's kind of hard to defend business. he had a henry hoover conception of heroic business, but in the early part of the depression it was almost impossible for any honest person to continue to take that line. so fortune and its writers including agee begin to confront some of the more unseemly side of the country. so fortune ran pieces about -- they ran a piece about the tennessee valley authority, which agee wrote and which luce told him was told there was one of the best things i've ever been printed since fortune had been around. so they were brought and pragmatically open to new deal reforms. and i keep mentioning dwight macdonald
america. for the entire time there i tried to get bourbon i couldn't. this is back in '80s, early '90s. >> right. david: scotch is their main drink. i imagine the same is true for asia. have you changed that already? >> same thing with me. i started about 25 years ago. in my first trip to london you couldn't find a bottle of jack daniels in a pub. now we're one of the largest selling spirits in the u.k. it has been dramatic change over last 25 years. where i started we sold four million of cases of jack daniels. most of that was in the united states. mostly 95%. now we're selling over 11 million cases of sway jack daniels in 150 countries, black label is the high-end bourbon. >> old number 7 is our flagship brand with the black label on it. that is our other story for us we have a family of brands. gentleman jack, jack single barrel are more expensive. both growing double-digit growth. our rtd business, in cans and bottles is millions of cans and bottles around the world growing five or 6%. our newest family member, jack daniels, tennessee whiskey or tennessee honey is selling nearly 8
news as we cover the lottery drawing. get the latest on "america this morning" and "good morning america." you will be able to find updates on abcnews.com. >> serious breaking news from southern california where residents have been trapped as a dangerous fire out of control. in riverside near banning had to block the else skascape route. one resident and two firefighters hurt. fast moving fire began mid afternoon and spread quickly. eight square miles. abc news is on the scene. we have a full report in our next half-hour. >> also three people suffering minor burns after a gas like sparked a fire on campus of college in suburban philadelphia. construction worker ruptured a 4 inch underground gas line while crews were installing a light post for an athletic complex. >> millions of people in the middle of the country are bracing for a day of wet and wild weather. a deadly rainmaker hovering over kansas and missouri. rapidly rising floodwaters are overtaking communities stranding families and keeping rescuers on the move. abc's ginger zee has more. >> the bank of the river there with
and so much rubble. this is fast becoming a simmering civil war. one of america's great allies in this region, awash in blood. on one side, the government admitted that 36 islamists in its custody were killed. while on the other, militants slaughtered two dozen egyptian police. the main concern as the killing continues is turning this new generation into fighters against not only the egyptian military, but the u.s. as well. martha raddatz. abc news, cairo. >>> olympic printer and double leg amputee, oscar pistorius, will be tried for the murder of his girlfriend next march. one of the developments from pistorius' court appearance yesterday. pistorius admitted to killing reeva steenkamp in february. he says he shot her by accident. pistorius face is a life sentence if convicted. >> now back at home, central idaho, residents are slowly allowed to return to their homes which have been, had been threatened by a fast-moving wildfire. abc's aditi roy is on the fire line. >> reporter: fanned by west winds, the beaver creek fire burns deep in the hills of sun valley, idaho. more than 1
issues. >> this morning on "world news now" -- rich relief. the world meets america's newest millionaire. we have new details about who is taking home one of the jack pots from new jersey. also ahead. >> my main goal for this whole project is to find the real paul. >> the decade old mystery of a missing baby. why this man believed that little boy was him. in an abc news exclusive, barbara walters sits down with the man in the middle of the heartbreaking mix-up. >> then forget about laying on the beach. how about hovering high above it. the newest vacation sensation. it's friday, august 9th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >>> tgif. can i get a high five. >> yes. >> we feel brown today. i feel like we work for ups or something. >> just need our patches. couple of things to deliver. >> boxes. >> couple boxes. it is friday. perfect way to start friday. starting with a feel good story. >> let's get to it. feel belt irtter if it was me. learning details about one of the winning powerball tick tets. >> but by a group of vehicle workers an
'm gregg jarrett. welcome to america news headquarters. >> heather: i'm heather childers. the taxman has been served. chairman investigating the irs scandal serves subpoenas to the treasury department to hand over more documents. we'll have the latest,. >> gregg: hundreds of spectators getting up early to see this controlled plant implosion when something goes horribly wrong
. and people all over america are experiencing in the mail every day sticker shock over their premiums and now, the internet is more organized and sophisticated to get out that anger in large numbers, don't you think? >> there is certainly anger and you will so insurance companies, u.s. chamber of commerce, get out there and sell a message that the sales tax on health care insurance will hurt consume sxers then the president and his organization trying to push people to enroll in to this to make the argument to help folks. but remember, there is not a bill hang negligent balance here and as much as the house tried to repeal all or part was health care reform. >> it is delay and so forth. but let me move on to immigration and what people refer to as amnesty. one group in particular that is fighting against amnesty and they have organized 58,000 people to either get out on the streets in protest or contact their congressman at their home offices. they know where they live in the home districts. what did that immigration? >> on immigration, you will have both sides gearing up here. folks that are
'll debate and let you decide whether it's fair. >>> hi, everyone. we're live from america's news headquarters. i'm jamie colby. we're waiting for president obama's arrival in orlando. this is video of the president and first lady departing andrews air force base. the commander in chief is set to speak at the opening session at the disabled veterans convention and address the consistent backlog of veteran disability claim. later they will travel to martha's vineyard for a nine-day vacation. the deadly search for a missing teenager turning to a rugged wilderness. investigators are now standing out near cascade, idaho, where suspected kidnapper and murder joe dimaggio is believe to be hiding. they believe he abducted hannah yanderson. last night, the sheriff officer confirmed her brother's remains were also found in the home. i'm jamie colby. i'll see you at 1:00 p.m. eastern right here on fox. have a great day. >> david: so much for lawmakers taking the same medicine they impose on the rest of us. under the healthcare law, congress and thousands of congressional staffer were going
.s. assets, and flatt tells cnbc there continues to be a lot of investment opportunity in america. flatt says he's bullish on the u.s. because housing, retail and manufacturing are all making a comeback, and he sees possibilities in the shale gas revolution. flatt also mentioned he's looking for value plays in europe and emerging markets. it's always fascinating to know how billionaires are investing *their money. insider monkey reveals warren buffett and others are buying shares of davita. the company owns kidney dialysis centers. billionairs are also bullish on sirius satellite radio company verisign. another popular stock with 1-percenters is an internet registry services company. and billionairs are also big on credit card stock visa. investors are keeping their eyes on priceline. the stock is closing in on a milestone: $1,000 a share. in its latest earnings, priceline notes "tremendous momentum" going forward. strength in europe helped revenues. noodles and company, which went public earlier this summer, is trading lower after its first set of earnings failed to increase investor appet
and how we can bring our a game to the table every day to serve america's communities that have many times too little access to health care. so i wanted to welcome you all to the room and welcome senator ben cardin to the room who is no stranger to baltimore medical since and has been around i got here, and that is like 300 years ago. senator was at the very beginning of a great assist to baltimore medical system when we had our help waiver. we had a medicare demonstration project for many years, and every time it looked like it was going to end or expire come -- the senator could be counted on to not only sure it will be realistic but to renew the effort to make sure that happened. when we wanted to build a brand- new building, he was the first one i came to see. which started the conversation when he was on one side of the hill and ended the conversation on the other side of the hill because it took that long for us to get the job done but the senator was responsible for the first public money coming into this venture that eventually grew into the building you were all sitting in now. fo
of the hand-outs across the america. that is at the bottom of the hour. but first on "forbes" grounded. justice department trying to slam breaks on the american.s. air merger. is that good or bad news for flyers? my mother made the best toffee in the world. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and make your business dream a reality. this man is about to be the millionth customer. would u mind if i go ahead of you? instead had someone go ahead of him and win fiy thousand dollars. congratulations you are our one millionth customer. nobody likes to miss out. that's why ally treats all their customers the same. whether you're the first or the millionth. if your bank doesn't think you're speci
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
are america's last remaining boom industries, and as you saw from the second act, they're basically fused with weiner and this other guy. it's hard to overstate just how successful "deep throat" was for a movie. >> it made an unbelievable amount of money. i guess then came "debbie does dallas" and "beyond the green door." and poor linda lovelace never saw a penny. >> john: oh, what a surprise. >> i know. >> john: what a shock-- a woman in porn did not see lots of money on the backend. ( laughter ) ( applause ) >> careful how you use the term "backend." >> john: i was halfway through that sentence thinking, "i know this end badly." >> has a different meaning in porn. but today, they-- i don't been backend, but they do-- they get highly paid. >> john: right. >> they make a nice living. >> john: the clever thing about this movie it's the same story told twice. you get the glammuous version of it for the first half of the film when it is funny, in which are you appear and the second half you get the reality of what you've just seen, which was appalling. >> horrible. >> john: because she suffe
for your ice ballet. come on, come on, now. is there nothing else that led america to this. >> president obama is cancelling his meeting with russia's president putin over tensions becausest n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> john: yes, that is clearly the only reason. it's-- it's always a good idea to pad out with what you really want to say with self-righteous human rights stuff like, "kimberly, we need a break. i don't like your stance on chine and tibetan monks and your boobs are weirding me out." if we want snowden back all we need to do is convince vladimir putin that snowden is gay. that away wayhe'llob a plane into u.s. custody faster than a definitely not homoerotic team of elastic clad men. that quick. actually, russia is not only global leadership story we're dealing with tonight which brins us to our new segment... indeed. now, we've already dealt with russia, so let's see where our magical dploab will take us next egypt! egypt. i just lift egypt. i'm not-- i'm not used to guns. ( laughter ) as the situation in egypt continues to devolve, the u.s. like a polar bear on a hastily
, america's first black president is said to deliver a major address to mark the anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech. >> in 1963, 250,000 people came to washington to hear martin luther king demand equality for black americans. >> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> the rally marked a turning point in the civil rights movement, force it onto the national agenda. less than one year later president lyndon johnson signed the civil rights act, which outlawed segregation. on saturday, thousands converged on to washington d.c. to commemorate the 30th anniversary -- 50th anniversary of the speech. the rally called for action on jobs, voting rights, and gun violence. >> this is not the time for a nostalgic commemoration, nor is it the time for self congratulatory celebration. the task is not done. the journey is not complete. we can and we must do more. >> speakers paid tribute to civil rights leaders for progress over the past five de
% of all children live in poverty. >> stephanie: in america. >> in america. >> stephanie: you say your wealth inequality statistics are staggering, and people just hear that, but i think they don't know what that means, but the word staggering, i think is dead on, don't you? >> yeah, i mean there's words in the industrialized nation, and it has gotten a lot worse, and what he used to pride ours on, what the american dream has always been, it's upward mobility that you can be born with nothing and then die a rich person. and the statistics now are that this really doesn't happen anymore. you get to be in the middle class the same way you get to be king, by virtue of birth. we just don't move anymore >> stephanie: and how do we resolve these numbers by kicking the downed to -- down-trodden. poor shaming is the justification that people are -- leave it to americans to kick people when they are down. and that's what they did again with the farm bill. >> they tell poor people to get a job. and they have a job, and they say they can't feed their family or pay their rent, and republicans say
's the chart. as josh brown pointed out this morning, for those who were -- thought this bet on america, on an american recovery was misguided -- >> or naive. >> slammed it in their face. stock's up 31% this year. >> to go back to the point as well, book value which buffett likes to use, up 2% for the quarter. in a period where travelers, some of the other big insurance competitors suffered because of their exposure to what was happening in the bond market. buffett what does he do? he buys companies. concentrated stakes in equities which did well in the second quarter and that helped outperform a the lot of his peers. >> buy a railroad, utility company in nevada hoping on recovery from recession there. big mac cr macro bets. >> tyson food, 69 cents, beat business 9 cents. revenue a beat. chicken and beef volume, up 4%, hard to do in this in economy. >> especially with beef prices the way they are. >> interesting you mention that. chicken feed costs up $105 million in the quart, less than 335 in the first half. the thinking is, they're looking at commodity costs coming down, even as pric
>>> tomorrow night, our special report, "gone to pot, america's marijuana obsession." dr. sanjay gupta on whether medical marijuana works and a group of women who swear pot makes them better parents. that's all for us tonight. anderson cooper's "360" starts right now. >>> tonight, breaking news in the search for an alleged killer and the young woman he's believed to be holding. also tonight, dr. sanjay gupta's bold claim that we've been systematically misled for 70 years about the medical value of marijuana. why he abandoned everything he thought he knew about it. later, anderson hears one man's account of capture and captivity in one of the deadliest war zones on earth, held in syria for 81 days. >>> we begin with breaking news in the search for james dimaggio and the stakes that keep rising. not only is he expected of kidnapping 16-year-old hannah anderson and her 8-year-old brother, not only is he wanted for the murder of their mother and he's hiding out in some of the most remote parts of the west and north west, but they're now preceding on the real possibility, they say he
. >> is it likely? >> i don't know the answer to that unfortunately because law enforcement management in america at the federal level is a disaster. >> do you agree with that, mitch? that's a pretty big statement. >> those are strong words for somebody who used to be a u.s. attorney. he outranks me. i'm not going to try to take that one out. >> you must be right. possible certainly isn't a lot of support for the federal prosecutions that we have in this country. >> i have great respect for the agents and the u.s. attorneys around the country who do a very difficult job. i was a u.s. attorney, i was an independent counsel. i've had a lot of experience. but i'm going to tell you something, federal government has gotten too big, federal law enforcement agencies have gotten too big. they are manageable. nobody know what is they're doing. look at the latest story about how the dea is providing information to the nsa interc t intercepts and are being told to lie to federal judges about it. you cannot have law enforcement functioning where they are told it's okay to lie to a federal judge about how a
, massachusetts. the town is number one on "money" magazine's new best small towns in america list for weathering the recession well and having a big lake and being close to both boston and providence. so close that you can commute to work in either city. it is also diverse. nine churches, seven synagogues and one of the largest mosques in new england. louisville, colorado, and vienna, virginia, round out the top three. >> bill: never heard of that city in massachusetts. nine churches in a town of 17,000? congregations are rather small, i would say because some people do not go to church at any rate. what we have -- very significant yesterday. there are two unrelated decisions regarding -- related to law enforcement that really were related. they weren't planned that way but they really do fit together and say something very important, i think, about law enforcement in this country. a lot of us have said for a long time that we went way overboard, you know. 10, 20 years ago. the last -- the previous generation about -- gotta be tough on crime. tough on law enforcement. crack down on crime. throw
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